Government agency planning nuclear waste dump apologizes for calling Skegness ‘Skegross’

A government body has apologized for misspelling Skegness as ‘kegross’ on a map used to demonstrate the final stage of a project ‘High level’ radioactive waste dump on the Lincolnshire coast.

Nuclear Waste Services, formerly Radioactive Waste Management, produced an overview of the search area on February 8 for further feasibility, showing the the District Council wards of Withern and Theddlethorpe and Mablethorpe as potentially suitable areas.

The map sent also included a wider view of the county and featured Skegness incorrectly named Skegross.

A government agency has apologized for misspelling Skegness (shown in a file photo) as ‘Skegross’ on a map used to demonstrate the final stage of a ‘high-rise’ radioactive waste landfill project level”.

While a spokesperson for the program’s task force apologized, residents said they needed to “up their game”.

Sara Bright, from Mablethorpe, and member of the Guardians of the East Coast campaign group, said: ‘From my perspective, how can you trust them to be professional?

former mayor of Skegness Councilman Danny Brookes, who is also a businessman at the station, also criticized the error.

The map sent also included a wider view of the county and featured Skegness incorrectly named Skegross

The map sent also included a wider view of the county and featured Skegness incorrectly named Skegross

He said: ‘They’re in charge of nuclear waste and they can’t even spell the name of Skegness, which is not far from Theddlethorpe.

“They’re supposed to research everything thoroughly, but they can’t find Skegness’s name properly.” They need to improve their game.

A spokesperson for the task force said Lincolnshire Live: ‘We made a spelling mistake on the expanded area map design.

“This was quickly corrected and we apologize for any confusion.”

The NWS proposes to house a Geological Storage Facility (GDF), which it describes as “an underground facility designed to safely dispose of high-level radioactive waste”.

Butlin’s History: Billy Butlin opened the first location in Skegness in 1936

Billy Butlin opened Butlin’s first site in Skegness on April 11, 1936, which doubled in size in its first year.

Two years later, a second camp opened at Clacton-on-Sea in Essex.

Mr Butlin gave up his two camps to help the war effort in the 1940s, with Clacton becoming an army camp and Skegness becoming HMS Royal Arthur. He also had sites in Ayr, Pwllheli and Filey.

He bought all the land after the war and opened heated indoor swimming pools in the 1950s.

In the 1970s, people began to vacation abroad more frequently, losing the distinctiveness of the British seaside.

The “holiday camps” disappeared, and the Butlins sold the business to the Rank Organization.

Mr Butlin died in 1980 and Redcoats lined his funeral procession.

Red coats were brought in after the families did not mix as Mr Butlin had hoped in the first week.

He ordered Norman Bradford, a senior engineer, to engage with the crowd, then go buy a distinctive blazer. Mr. Butlin decided that red represented the cheerful holiday atmosphere he wanted. The Redcoats were born at the end of his first week in business.

Before being transported to depth, the waste would arrive at a surface facility of approximately one square kilometer.

The three district council wards chosen should provide deep nuclear waste disposal and contain the necessary surface infrastructure.

In its update, the task force said: ‘The process of finding a site is likely to take many years and other areas of England, including West Cumbria, are also being considered.’

“A GDF will only be built in Lincolnshire if there is a willing host community and a suitable site that can be demonstrated to be safe. If the community doesn’t want it, it won’t be built.

He added that the former Theddlethorpe gas terminal site would continue to be a ‘key area of ​​interest’ for surface facilities and that the deep geology below the coastal zone beyond the coast would remain to be considered. for the basement.

Mablethorpe was included because of its proximity to the boundary of the gas terminal site and ‘the possibility of locating certain facilities, such as offices or training facilities at other locations, including the district council area.

The public will have the final say on the project’s continuation in a binding referendum.

Even if the program materializes, the first trains of waste would not arrive until the 2040s at the earliest.

In March 2020, it was revealed that a report commissioned by the council had highlighted hygiene fears over Skegness’ ‘very dirty’ Jolly the Fisherman mascot costumes, as well as ‘resources and operation costs”.

The character is based on the poster created by artist John Hassall in 1908 to advertise Great Northern Railways.

The famous illustration was accompanied by the slogan: “Skegness is so toned”.

The costs are “more than many imagine” due to strict regulations, especially if carried by more than one person, he had said.

No one can wear the costume for more than 20 minutes without taking a 20 minute break, and all mascots must be checked to ensure they can work with children.

Skegness became a popular seaside resort in the 1870s after the advent of the railways and has continued to become popular for day trippers and holidaymakers over the decades.

In March 2020, it was revealed that a report commissioned by the City Council had highlighted hygiene concerns over Jolly the Fisherman mascot costumes

In March 2020, it was revealed that a report commissioned by the City Council had highlighted hygiene fears over Skegness’ “very dirty” Jolly the Fisherman mascot costumes.

In 1936 the first Butlin resort was built there, in the village of Ingoldmells.

The name Skegness is made up of the Old Norse words ‘Skeggi’, which means ‘bearded’ and ‘ness’, which means a promontory.

It is believed that Skeggi could have been the name of a Viking settler, or that ‘Skeg’ comes from ‘Skegg’, the Norse word for beard, to refer to the shape of the earth.